Tag Archives: Django Unchained

More on Django Unchained

Django UnchainedI have stated many of my reservations regarding Django Unchained in my review. Regardless of your opinion, it has proven to be a provocative movie. After seeing it for a second time on Boxing Day, here are some of my additional thoughts:

–       One thing I neglected to talk about in my review is how badass Jamie Foxx is in this film, especially with Christoph Waltz and Leonardo DiCaprio stealing the scenes for much of the movie. Despite not being Tarantino’s first choice for the role, Foxx has proven to be the right man. The speech he gave at the end of the film is executed (no pun intended) like “shooting a dog in the street,” as one character would say. Will Smith might have done fine (we’ll never know), but Foxx has that edginess and attitude that I don’t see the Fresh Prince (aka Hitch) possess. Can you imagine Morgan Freeman playing the role of Stephen instead of Samuel L. Jackson? (That would actually be interesting.)

–       A second viewing also gave me a chance to pay more attention to the use of music. The Morricone pieces fit swimmingly. Even the original music—a first in a Tarantino flick— is not bad, save for the Rick Ross snoozer that is confusingly out of place given how the tail end of that tough-guy rap song is paired with Django’s daydream vision of his beautiful wife Broomhilda. The James Brown/Tupac remix works fine with the gunfight scene and the John Legend song is tonally in sync with the rest of the soundtrack. Continue reading

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Branded to Kill: Quentin Tarantino’s DJANGO UNCHAINED

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In a conversation between pretend slaver Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) and plantation owner Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), the former mentions his desire to change the name of the subject of their transaction—Eskimo Joe—to something with more panache. This exchange of seemingly little importance is merely a scheme Schultz hatched up with his partner Django (Jamie Foxx) for the purpose of saving the latter’s enslaved wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington). Yet the word “panache” has stuck with me long after the screening, mainly because of how accurate it describes Quentin Tarantino’s approach to Django Unchained. Admittedly, panache has never been in short supply in his previous films but his latest is designed with the kind of fireworks that is aimed to maximize its appeal as broadly as a 165-minute violent R-rated picture can be. Continue reading

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